CHAPTER ONE: OVERVIEW

Chapter I: OVERVIEW • Chapter II: KEEP LEARNING • Chapter III: FOOD INSECURITY & RACE • Chapter IV: KEEP DOING


Thank you for taking this opportunity to dig deeper into the issue of food insecurity. We hope that this provides some context to your volunteerism, and that by learning more about the root causes of food insecurity, you will become a more powerful advocate for those who experience it.

Why do we say "food insecurity" instead of "hungry?"

You can learn more here and read the U.S. Department of Agriculture definitions here.

 

Who does food insecurity impact?

Food insecurity impacts people from nearly every community in the country. Some communities - particularly Black, Latinx, and Indigenous communities - experience greater rates of food insecurity due to systemic racial inequities. Feeding America has more information about how food insecurity affects the most vulnerable in our community:

Black/African American Communities and Food Insecurity Children and Food Insecurity
Indigenous Communities and Food Insecurity Latinx Communities and Food Insecurity
Older Adults and Food Insecurity Rural Communities and Food Insecurity

 

Why is learning about this important?

As of 2021, roughly 1 million Los Angeles County residents do not know where their next meal will come from - yet California produces half the nation's fruits and vegetables! Take a closer look at how food insecurity affected Los Angeles County before the COVID-19 pandemic here.

Millions of children and families are impacted by food insecurity every day. Food insecurity can affect everything from school attendance and performance to workplace productivity to broader physical and mental health problems.

People struggling with food insecurity are often forced to choose between their next meal or paying rent, between buying groceries or buying medicine, or between feeding themselves or their children.

 

Continue reading to take a deeper look at why the food insecurity crisis exists.